Trade Expert: Australia Backs Moroccan Sovereignty over Western Sahara

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Rabat – The chairman of the Arab-Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry, Roland Jabbour,  has said that Australia “strongly support the sovereignty of the kingdom of Morocco and its territorial integrity.”

Jabbour said that Australia’s support is based on the “belief that prosperity is achieved through unity.”

Talking to the press after a meeting with the Moroccan secretary of state to minister of foreign affairs, Mounia Boucetta, Jabbour said that he is “impressed” by the development he has witnessed in all regions of Morocco. He also expressed his country’s determination to reinforce diplomatic ties with Morocco.

Jabbour also spoke about Morocco’s investment opportunities, “which will certainly promote” Australian-Moroccan bilateral ties.

Jabbour said that Morocco is a gateway to both Africa and Europe.

It is a “springboard that will allow us direct access to both continents through many free trade agreements with the European Union and the rest of Africa.”

The determination of Jabbour to reinforce trade and diplomatic relations with Morocco was also emphasized by Morocco’s Minister of Agriculture Aziz Akhannouch, who visited Australia in February.

During the visit, the agricultural minister for the Australian state of Victoria, Jaclyn Symes, said that “Victoria has shown great interest in supporting Morocco in the development of its agriculture and fisheries sectors.”

The two-way trade between Morocco and Australia reached MAD 660 million ($69 million) in 2017.

In a previous statement, the Australian ambassador to Rabat, Berenice Owen-Jones told Morocco World News that “Australian exports comprised around AUD 40 million [$29 million], mostly in wheat, meat and paints, and imports from Morocco were valued at around AUD 57 million [$41 million], including fertilisers, clothing and vegetables.”

In addition to Australia, the Czech Republic also recently expressed support for Morocco’s autonomy plan as a durable political solution to end the “artificial” conflict.

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