Connect with us

South Africa

South African Languishing In Kuwait Jail Since 2008

Published

on

The power of friendship should never be under-estimated as you never know when you might need a helping hand.

Such is the case of SANDF military veteran Gareth Rutherford who is serving a life sentence in Kuwait for drug trafficking – a charge he vehemently denies.

His military friends have rallied behind him in an attempt to get him freed or his sentence commuted.

Rutherford runs his blog from the Kuwait Central Prison where he explained his version of events on the fateful day he was arrested.

On his way to the airport to catch a flight to Cape Town from Kuwait on 18 September 2008 – a trip he had been looking forward to – he was asked to make a detour into the city to pick up a package for a friend.

ALSO READ   Angolan Opposition Parties Rejects Election Results Declared By The Electoral Commission (CNE)

Rutherford did not think much of it. He stopped at a tyre shop and a group of men loaded the vehicle he was travelling in with tyres. When he left the tyre shop‚ he drove straight into what he believes was a trap.

Law enforcement officials cornered him. They searched his vehicle and found drugs hidden inside the tyres.

Rutherford explains that his lawyer hardly ever pitched up for court dates and that he didn’t have an interpreter during court proceedings‚ which adversely affected him. In the end he was made to sign a confession which was written in Arabic and not translated to him.

Dawid Lotter‚ a military friend‚ is at his wits’ end in his attempts to try to save Rutherford but he refuses to give up until he is reunited with his friend.

ALSO READ   Zambia - Kamanga Women Form Vigilantee Group To Arrest Prostitutes Terrorizing Their Husbands

“He would never do the thing that they are accusing him of. He is not that kind of person” said Lotter.

Lotter has set up an online petition that will hopefully get his friend’s sentence mitigated. Rutherford’s initial sentence was a death sentence but was later changed to a life sentence.

Lotter explains that the two met in 1980 during Operation Sceptic. Rutherford was a lance corporal and Lotter a captain.

During this same operation‚ Rutherford was awarded a medal for the bravery he displayed during the war.

“In operation sceptic in 1980 he was awarded the highest order for his bravery. In the battlefield while everything was burning and people dying‚ Gareth was running around in the midst of the chaos to rescue his comrades.”

ALSO READ   Mauritian Deputy Premier Lectures Tanzanian Stakeholders On Tourism, Economic Growth, PPP

But a never die attitude of a true soldier has seen Lotter refusing to give up on his friend who is stuck in the Middle East.

Lotter has called on the help of his fellow army men that served with him and Rutherford to sign the petition and spread the word on it.

Lotter aims to get 5‚000 signatures on the petition so that he can take it to the Emir in Kuwait and explain that Rutherford has been wrongly sentenced for a charge of a doubtful nature. The petition currently has 1‚799 signatures.

– TimesLIVE

South Africa

South Africa – Jubilation As Jacob Zuma Survives Vote Of No – Confidence

Published

on

Zuma survives, vote of no confidence

The South African president, Jacob Zuma, has narrowly survived a motion of no confidence against him in parliament, the most serious attempt yet to unseat him after months of growing anger over allegations of corruption and a sinking economy.

It was the sixth such vote of his increasingly beleaguered presidency, but the first involving a secret ballot, with a broad coalition of opposition parties and renegade MPs from the ruling African National Congress (ANC) falling just short of the simple majority needed to force Zuma and his cabinet to resign immediately.

The ballot counting was accompanied by scenes of singing and dancing on both sides of the assembly, as rival parties sought to project confidence. “We taught you this song, and you don’t even sing it properly,” jeered the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters leader Julius Malema, dressed in signature red overalls, addressing his ANC counterparts.

The South African president, Jacob Zuma, has narrowly survived a motion of no confidence against him in parliament, the most serious attempt yet to unseat him after months of growing anger over allegations of corruption and a sinking economy.

It was the sixth such vote of his increasingly beleaguered presidency, but the first involving a secret ballot, with a broad coalition of opposition parties and renegade MPs from the ruling African National Congress (ANC) falling just short of the simple majority needed to force Zuma and his cabinet to resign immediately.

The ballot counting was accompanied by scenes of singing and dancing on both sides of the assembly, as rival parties sought to project confidence. “We taught you this song, and you don’t even sing it properly,” jeered the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters leader Julius Malema, dressed in signature red overalls, addressing his ANC counterparts.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - President Nyusi Knocks Labour Officials For Their Indifference On Employer - Workers Dispute

Baleka Mbete, the National Assembly’s speaker, announced the result: 198 MPs voted against, compared with 177 in favour. There were nine abstentions. “Therefore the motion of no confidence in the president is accordingly negative,” declared Mbete.

ANC MPs in parliament whooped and danced at the news.

An upbeat President Zuma arrived at the parliamentary precinct about an hour after the result was announced. “I’ve just come to say thank you to all of you. Those comrades who are in parliament needed the support from the membership. You came in your numbers to demonstrate that the ANC is there, is powerful, is big. It is difficult to defeat the ANC, but you can try,” he said.

He then gave a rendition of Yinde Lendlela, his signature tune. The title translates from Zulu as “It’s a Long Road”, and the implication is clear: his journey is not over yet.

In the hours before Tuesday’s vote, a series of coordinated protests across South Africa demanded Zuma’s removal. A petition signed by more than a million people was delivered to the deputy president, Cyril Ramaphosa, who is seen as Zuma’s main rival.

Pro-Zuma supporters celebrate after the vote of no confidence against the president was defeated.
Pinterest
Pro-Zuma supporters celebrate after the vote of no confidence against the president was defeated. Photograph: Mike Hutchings/Reuters

Zuma, 75, has never been far from scandal since he became president in 2009. Another major criticism raised during the parliamentary debate included allegations that he had allowed the state to be “captured” by the Guptas, an Indian business family that has been at the centre of a string of media exposés about graft in government and state-owned enterprises.

ALSO READ   Kenyan Presidential Hopeful Charged For Attempted Suicide

The no-confidence motion was brought by the Democratic Alliance (DA), the largest opposition party, in response a cabinet reshuffle in March, in which Zuma sacked the popular finance minister Pravin Gordhan. The president was playing “Russian roulette” with the economy, according to the DA leader, Mmusi Maimane.

“I never imagined that one day I would be here in this parliament fighting a new form of oppression,” Maimane said during the debate on the motion. “A corrupt system that keeps our people imprisoned in poverty. If you told me that one day our democratically elected president would end up corrupted and captured by a criminal syndicate, I would have never believed you. But here we are.”

In response, ANC MPs argued that the party remained united behind Zuma, and had set up internal processes to deal with accusations of corruption and poor governance. The no-confidence motion was dismissed repeatedly as an attempted power grab by the opposition.

“[The opposition] are using the constitution so as to collapse government, deter service delivery and sow the seeds of chaos in society so as to ultimately grab power … Shame on you!” said Doris Dlakude, the ANC’s deputy chief whip.

Although Zuma has survived this battle, he is still fighting for his political future. His term as president expires in 2019 and under the South African constitution he cannot run again.

More immediately, his term as president of the ANC expires in 2017. He is lobbying hard to install the former African Union Commission chair Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, who is his ex-wife, as his successor. Opponents within the party are largely rallying behind Ramaphosa, although there are other names in the mix.

ALSO READ   Transitional Justice In Tunisia - A Painful but Necessary Step Forward

Despite the parliamentary defeat, Maimane hailed the close vote as a victory for the opposition DA. “Today’s motion of no confidence result is closer than anyone expected. The result reveals an ANC that is totally divided against itself. Jacob Zuma has survived, but he has nothing to celebrate tonight. He is mortally wounded and his party is in tatters. Tonight’s result, despite the slender victory, signals the death of the ANC,” he said in a statement.

But outside parliament, where hundreds of pro-Zuma supporters were gathered, a celebratory atmosphere prevailed. The police minister, Fikile Mbalula, told the crowd. “We were inside [parliament], they said they’re going to topple the president. But with your support, we have defeated them inside. There are those who have been asking [us to vote with] our conscience. We’ve got political conscience to keep the ANC in power forever, and that is political conscience … The African National Congress will survive!”

While the ANC, Africa’s oldest liberation movement, and the president live to fight another day, there is little doubt that both are wounded by Tuesday’s proceedings. “ANC MPs were ordered to vote to retain President Zuma. It looks like at least 25, possibly as many as 30, willingly defied that order. This looks like the first big sign of a possible rebellion against him in the ANC,” said Stephen Grootes, a political analyst with Eyewitness News.

Zuma must also contend with a supreme court of appeal hearing on 15 September, which will decide whether to reinstate 783 criminal charges against him, including fraud, corruption and racketeering.

Via The Guardian

Continue Reading

South Africa

South Africa – Malema warns students ‘Zuma will be in Dubai in 2019, not Nkandla’

Published

on

Since the #GuptaLeaks began pouring through the gates, South Africans have been made aware that the Gupta’s may very well end up being the catalyst that SAVES Zuma from facing charges and potential jail time. That may sound odd, how can Zuma’s fellow criminals be the one that saves him? Surely their interactions would only help put him away? We’ll tell you what, not if they help him move to Dubai.

ALSO READ   Zambia - Mutati Is New Finance Minister As Pres. Lungu Unveils Part Cabinet

While Zuma has denied that he “owns’ a Dubai mansion, the #GuptaLeaks emails and EFF Commander in Chief Julius Malema, say otherwise.

With the EFF’s 4th birthday on Wednesday, Malema and co addressed students at the University of KwaZulu-Natal.

“Zuma is going to stay in Dubai, he has a house in Dubai, the money that was supposed to pay for your [student] accommodation!”

Malema also warned the students that once Zuma has run away in 2019, they will be left in South Africa with the EFF. Check out the video from TimesLIVE below.

Continue Reading

South Africa

South Africa – Remembering South African struggle hero Chris Hani: lessons for today

Published

on

This article first appeared on The Conversation

The “what if” game is popular with the media and the commentariat in South Africa. A popular example is “what if …” South African Communist Party (SACP) leader Chris Hani were still alive.

What, for example, would he say about the SACP’s tripartate alliance partner, the African National Congress? What would he say about the state of the alliance after recent calls by both partners, the SACP and union federation Cosatu for President Jacob Zuma to step down?

These questions are being asked again on the anniversary of Hani’s assassination on April 10, 1992 by two rightwing extremists.

But such use, often by the liberal media, of Hani’s name (and those of other fallen cadres of the liberation movement) is problematic. It seeks to isolate Hani from the movement that produced him, presenting him as an exception it can then appropriate.

Hani’s name is also regularly invoked by the SACP and the ANC come election time. Many campaign posters call on supporters to “Do it for Chris Hani”. Here, the summoning of Hani’s memory has become little more than empty rhetoric.

ALSO READ   11 Things British visitors should know before they land in South Africa

A more useful exercise may be to reflect on Hani’s life, actions and beliefs, and their significance for today.

A popular hero

In his book “A Jacana Pocket Biography: Chris Hani” historian Hugh Macmillan argues it was Hani’s physical and moral bravery, his compassion and humanity that made him a “popular hero” – the words used by French philosopher Jacques Derrida to describe Hani in his Spectres of Marx lecture.

Hani helped build a culture of internal criticism in the ANC. In 1969 he and six other commissars and commanders of Umkhonto we Sizwe, the ANC’s military wing, signed what became known as the “Hani memorandum”. The memorandum outlined the “frightening depth of the rot in the ANC”, accusing its leadership of careerism, corruption and persecution by the party’s security.

Hani’s memorandum was the catalyst for one of the most significant events in the history of the ANC in exile, a conference in Morogoro, Tanzania. But it was viewed as treacherous by some within the leadership, particularly those it had criticised. Hani and his comrades were expelled from the ANC and only reinstated after the Morogoro conference.

ALSO READ   Donald Trump Meets With President Al Sisi Of Egypt Whom Obama Refused To Meet

Russian scholar Vladimir Shubin has argued that it was largely thanks to the memorandum that the delegates to the conference included rank and file MK members and not just the leadership.

The Morogoro conference opened ANC membership to non-Africans. It also adopted the important “Strategy and Tactics” document. This provided – for the first time since the ANC’s banning in 1960 – a systematic assessment of the conditions of struggle and an overall vision for defeating apartheid in a time of deep political demoralisation.

The conference was a moment of self-reflection. It helped the ANC to overcome the state of crisis and demoralisation that had set in.

The ability of the leadership of both the ANC and its closest ally, the SACP, to reassess circumstances, interrogate these and themselves, and learn from past mistakes to overcome difficult moments is one of the most important lessons from their history. This tradition of internal debate has become eroded, and criticism keeps being silenced as sowing disunity.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - President Nyusi Knocks Labour Officials For Their Indifference On Employer - Workers Dispute

Disrupting notions of masculinity

A famous quote by Che Guevara states that “the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love”. Leaders like Hani were moved to act by their hearts as well as by reason. The decision to join the liberation struggle was one of reason – a conscious rejection of apartheid oppression and inequality. But it was also a choice informed by “revolutionary love” or a “love for the people” – shaped by a sense of justice and by compassion, as well as by a vision, the ability to imagine a different future.

As struggle veteran and public intellectual Raymond Suttner points out in Recovering Democracy in South Africa, what is new and alarming about many of the ANC’s

Continue Reading

South Africa

South Africa – Anaconda Sends Kruger National Park Visitors Running In All Directions (Video)

Published

on

(Viewers Descretion is adviced)
Snakes and spiders ey? Unless you are one of the few people who has a strange desire to keep them as a pet, you are like the rest of us normal human beings who shit ourselves when we see one. This group of people at the Kruger National Park clearly weren’t the pet kind…

ALSO READ   Transitional Justice In Tunisia - A Painful but Necessary Step Forward

We get scared just seeing your average size mole snake or house spider. This one particular safaris group thought it was all fun and games looking at the snake in the distance, then the snake decided to slither into the cars engine. The group drove on for a little while before stopping to open the bonnet, more happy tranquil picks were taken….

ALSO READ   Western Sahara - Ireland Reassures Frent Polisario On Sahrawi Natural Resources

Suddenly the snake decided to leave the car and ALL HELL BROKE LOOSE, people were trying to run and film at the same god damn time! It makes for great watching, check it out below.


< a href="https://www.thesouthafrican.com" target="_blank">Via The South African

Continue Reading

South Africa

S. Africa – Zuma Defends Xenophobic South Africans (See Video)

Published

on

South Africans fed up with crime, not xenophobic – Zuma
Lizeka Tandwa and Jenna Etheridge,
Johannesburg – President Jacob Zuma says the march against immigrants in Pretoria on Friday is evidence that citizens are fed up with crime.

Speaking after the launch of Operation Phakisa, which is aimed at boosting various sectors of the South African economy, he said the march included foreign nationals, was well organised and was not xenophobic.

“We do have a big problem. This time around this has been provoked by crime.”

ALSO READ   Madagascar - Cyclone Enawo, 81 dead, 18 Missing, Children Worst Affected

He said the media should be careful about labelling the protests as xenophobic. Political leaders must also be cautious with their messages.

Crime affects everyone and people are fed up, he said.

“If there are people who occupy houses and use them for crime this will make people angry. How do we fight crime?

“We must focus on drug lords and deal with them. Those are the gaps we need to close.”

Whether South African or foreign, criminals should be dealt with using the proper channels, he said.

ALSO READ   Kenyan Presidential Hopeful Charged For Attempted Suicide

LIVE: Pretoria ‘remains under control’ – SAPS

‘Europe doesn’t want immigrants’

A group calling itself the Mamelodi Concerned Residents organised the march to the Department of Home Affairs in Pretoria on Friday to protest the presence of immigrants in South Africa.

Police had to use stun grenades and rubber bullets to diffuse a tense stand-off between foreign nationals and South Africans in Marabastad.

A small clash between foreign shop owners and South African marchers also broke out in Christoffel Street. The police were quick to react and the fight was quelled.

ALSO READ   BIAFRAEXIT REFERENDUM- Amaechi, Wike, Timipre, Others Unite, Kick Against Freedom Of Niger Delta

Zuma urged South Africans to be understanding towards foreign nationals.

He questioned the idea that South Africans are xenophobic, saying if they were “this country wouldn’t have this many immigrants”.

He said only 5% of immigrants were refugees.

“The number of foreigners in South Africa is far more than in Europe. They don’t want immigrants.”

Zuma said he had met with his ministers to discuss what they could do to fight crime.

He would also be talking tothere police.
[KGVID]https://www.afroinsider.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/South-Africans-fed-up-with-crime-not-xenophobic-Zuma-News24.mp4[/KGVID]

Continue Reading

South Africa

S. Africa – Shooting In Durban 3 Dead, 12 Wounded

Published

on

A bloody shooting spree in Umlazi’s G-Section in the early hours of Saturday morning left three people dead and 12 people wounded.

It is understood that a group of gunmen ran rampant at a tavern‚ spraying automatic gunfire at patrons before making their way to a house in the same street. Inside the house on Mandla Mandlotha Street‚ three people were murdered‚ one of them a woman who had also been raped.

ALSO READ   BIAFRAEXIT REFERENDUM- Amaechi, Wike, Timipre, Others Unite, Kick Against Freedom Of Niger Delta

Police confronted the suspects at the house and shot and killed one of the gang members.

Government officials were set to visit the house later on Saturday.

TMG Digital/TimesLIVE

Continue Reading

South Africa

South Africa – The Body of A Man Was Found In Muldersdrift By Paramedics.

Published

on

Johannesburg – ER24 Paramedics reported that the body of an unidentified man was found lying in middle of Idaba lane, Muldersdrift.

Spokesperson Russel Meiring said paramedics were dispatched to the scene after security forces found the naked body.

“Paramedics assessed the man and found that he had sustained a serious wound on his neck and showed no signs of life. It was apparent that the man had been dead for some time,” said Meiring.

ALSO READ   Zambia - Kamanga Women Form Vigilantee Group To Arrest Prostitutes Terrorizing Their Husbands

“Unfortunately, nothing could be done for the man and he was declared dead on the scene.”

Local authorities were on the scene investigating the circumstances leading to the death.

Continue Reading

South Africa

Toulon: If you sign Johan Goosen, you’re a bastard

Published

on

French club’s president, Mourad Boudjellal, says recruiting the Bok utility back would undermine the rights of clubs. It doesn’t happen very often that French rugby clubs support each other but Johan Goosen has changed that to an extent.

The 24-year-old Springbok utility back’s dodgy “retirement” at the weekend to skip out of his lucrative contract with Racing Metro clearly hasn’t led to any goodwill from other teams. Mourad Boudjellal, president of Toulon, has even gone as far as stating that any team that signs Goosen next are “bastards”. Also read: 24 and out! Shock for SA rugby as Johan Goosen retires “What he does is a breach of his contract.

ALSO READ   Nigerian Government Runs Out Of Options Resort To Psychological Warfare And Blackmail

When a player has such an attitude, he must find closed doors everywhere,” Boudjellal told Rugby Rama. “Whichever club president signs Goosen next is a bastard. If a president signs, it puts all the other presidents of the Top 14 in danger. “When you sign a contract with a player, you already do not have many rights but many obligations.

ALSO READ   Algerian Prime Minister Refutes Racist Comments By His Country Men Against Sub-Saharan African Migrants

If a president recruits him, there will be even fewer rights.” Goosen has apparently tried to exploit a loophole in his so-called CDI contract. That theoretically means he had a “job for life” until he retires. By allegedly accepting a role as commercial director in a unnamed South African company, Goosen is forced to “retire” from full-time rugby.

And that means he could get out of his R7.27 million per year contract a bit easier. Also read: Racing ready to sue ‘irresponsible’ Johan Goosen However, another report has linked Goosen to the English club Gloucester. If he signs, he can’t play for any French club for at least 18 months. There are also rumours that Goosen, who is “homesick”, wants to retire in order to lower his market value for a South African side to be able to afford him.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - President Nyusi Knocks Labour Officials For Their Indifference On Employer - Workers Dispute

Continue Reading

South Africa

11 Things British visitors should know before they land in South Africa

Published

on

1. Bru is not a mid-afternoon beverage.

Doubly confusing for any English arrivals. Not only does it raise false hope of his favourite hot drink, the overtly friendly “howzit, bru!” is far too familiar and intimate for the traditional gentleman. Go on, just give him his tea. He’s had a long journey.

2. Bunny chows and monkey glands are nothing to be afraid of.

Don’t tell us you’re coming all this way just to carry on eating meat-and-two-veg and egg and chips. We promise they’re not real monkey glands. Honestly…

3. Find yourself in a minibus taxi? Don’t sit in the front!

Unless you’re a qualified accountant with a sense of adventure, dive in the back and enjoy the ride. Otherwise, you’ll be rifling through a wad of notes and a fistful of coins on behalf of your driver and gaartjie, who should be counting it himself but is far too busy whistling at pretty young women out of the open door.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - Secret Debt, IMF and donors outraged

4. There’s something that sets the names apart-heid.

Alarmed to see a statue of coloniser supreme Jan van Riebeeck? Find yourself driving past a school named in honour of apartheid prime minister and Nazi sympathiser, DF Malan? Don’t panic, we just haven’t got around to changing the signs yet. Anyway, we also have a lovely memorial of that nice Cecil Rhodes chap to take your mind off it.

5. Hiring a car? Obey the robots…

No, they’re not our new traffic policing overlords. When you get to the amusingly-named traffic lights, simply do what other South Africans do. Have a quick look around for the cops, then ignore them completely.

6. Join in with the African Walk.

ALSO READ   Transitional Justice In Tunisia - A Painful but Necessary Step Forward

At the robots as a pedestrian? Don’t worry about why they make funny noises here and cross the road like the locals instead. Red or green, make like you’re running across the street waving your arms about, while actually moving slower than walking pace. Don’t ask why, it’s just what we do.

7. Those big birds making a racket aren’t dinosaurs.

Meet the har-de-dar! With a fondness for rummaging through fast food containers and bin bags, they wouldn’t have lasted long in prehistoric times. Placid creatures that pose minimal threat to tourists beyond noise pollution.

8. Township tours are weird.

Sure, poverty porn attracts big television audiences. But the residents of these areas don’t need you flying past, pointing cameras at them from behind tinted windows before posting a one-star review on Trip Advisor because it looked ‘unsafe’, thank you very much.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - President Nyusi Knocks Labour Officials For Their Indifference On Employer - Workers Dispute

9. If someone will be with you “just now”, don’t hold your breath.

Fans of prompt British timekeeping beware, African Time works in mysterious ways. You might be better off trying that other bar down the road…

10. Everything is bigger. Get used to it.

Mountains, journey times, rugby players… South Africa is a supersized kind of a place. And you thought your 45-minute commute to work in London was arduous!

11. Enjoy every second. South Africa is beautiful.

If you learn one thing, learn this: Take in every view, cherish every glass of affordable wine and make conversation with everyone you come across. There’s a lot of negative rubbish written about South Africa – see beyond that and you’ll have the time of your life.

Continue Reading

South Africa

Cautious optimism as latest analysis shows reduction of maritime crime across traditional hot spots

Published

on

The Gulf of Guinea, south-east Asia and the Indian Ocean High Risk Area (HRA) have all seen a significant reduction of reported maritime crime throughout July, August and September of this year according to the latest Q3 analysis released by Dryad Maritime.

With the exception of the Sulu Sea, incidents of maritime crime in south-east Asia are at the lowest since 2009 and i the Indian Ocean HRA there were no confirmed acts of piracy in Q3, with the last recorded incident of piracy reported on a merchant vessel in 2014.

In the Gulf of Guinea and in Nigeria’s Economic Exclusion Zone (EEZ) there has been a decrease in the frequency of attacks with just four attacks against commercial shipping at sea off the Niger Delta since early July, this compares to 36 in the first six months of the year.

ALSO READ   Transitional Justice In Tunisia - A Painful but Necessary Step Forward

Despite this quarter’s positive statistics, the analysis is released with the caveat that expectations for the remainder of the year, especially in relation to the Gulf of Guinea, should be tempered.

Ian Millen, Chief Operating Officer at Dryad Maritime, said: “We have cause for some optimism on piracy and maritime crime, with a generally stable and improving situation in some areas balanced against some serious cause for concern in others.
“In the Gulf of Aden and Indian Ocean, Somali piracy remains broadly contained and, in south-east Asia piracy is at its lowest level since 2009, with a 65% reduction when compared to this time last year. The bad news, however, is 81 people have been kidnapped, seven have been killed and 61 remain in captivity.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - Secret Debt, IMF and donors outraged

“Beyond piracy and maritime crime, the maritime domain poses other threats. From conflict situations ashore in Libya and Yemen, to the threat of anti-ship missiles in busy shipping lanes, evidenced by recent incidents in the southern Red Sea, seafarers continue to trade and transit in some dangerous waters.

“The continuing humanitarian crisis of Mediterranean migration puts other pressures on the shipping industry and its seafarers; a situation in which ships’ crews have responded to admirably.

ALSO READ   Mozambique - President Nyusi Knocks Labour Officials For Their Indifference On Employer - Workers Dispute

But despite all of the global maritime risks, we should remember those who are well-informed and well-prepared can continue to operate safely across the vast majority of the globe.”

Continue Reading

Trending