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Kenya’s economy records slowest growth in five years

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Kenya’s economy grew by 4.9 per cent in 2017, recording the slowest margin in five years amid prolonged electoral process and adverse weather.

That pace of growth falls far below the 5.9 per cent recorded in 2016, data released today by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics (KNBS) indicate.

The last time Kenya recorded growth below five per cent was in 2012, also an election year, when the economy expanded by 4.5 per cent.

“The slowdown in the performance of economy was partly attributable to uncertainty associated both a prolonged electioneering period coupled with adverse effects of weather,” said Treasury and Planning Secretary Henry Rotich.

The KNBS data shows that agriculture, which accounted for 31.5 per cent of the 2017 GDP grew by only 1.6 per cent compared with 5.1 per cent in 2016.

All the segments except cut flowers shrunk during the period. Export earnings from cut flower grew by 16.1 per cent to hit Ksh82.2 billion ($819.9 million) in 2017.

On the flip side, sugarcane deliveries to factories dropped by 33.3 per cent, from 7.2 million tonnes in 2016 to 4.8 million tonnes last year.

Inflation

Kenyans also had to contend with steady build-up in inflationary pressure on the back of rising oil and food prices through 2017. The KNBS data shows inflation rose to an average of 8 per cent last year, up from 6.3 per cent the previous year.

“We have lined up several interventions, which together with continuing political stability, good rains and macro-economic environment will lead to better economic performance in 201`8,” said Mr Rotich.

“Inflation is expected to ease in 2018 supported by lower food prices due to good rains and improved agriculture,” he added.

Via The East African

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Hundreds Of Iphone X Stolen From Ups Truck

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Today is iPhone X launch day, and as is typical of a new iPhone launch it has seen people lining up hours in advance outside Apple Stores to get one. However, three individuals got their hands on the iPhone X early yesterday by stealing hundreds of them.

As CNET reports, the theft took place outside an Apple Store in Stonestown, San Francisco. A UPS truck containing 313 iPhone X handsets was broken into by theives who proceeded to unload the phones into a white Dodge van before driving off. The police have the description and serial number of every single stolen iPhone, with their total value thought to be over $370,000. They also have a photo og the theft in process taken by a janitor.

The theft is suspicious for a couple of reasons. The UPS truck had its cargo area locked while parked outside the Stonestown Galleria mall, yet the thieves had no problem gaining access. They also either got very lucky or knew exactly which UPS truck to target to grab the very expensive iPhones. I doubt

it was luck.

Apple says there will be no problems with supplying the iPhone X to customers who planned to pick one up from the Stonestown Apple Store. That’s surprising considering how constrained stock is thought to be. But maybe this is a sign stock levels are actually much better than we expected.

With the serial number of each stolen phone known, it should be possible to track them all down eventually. Unfortunately, the thieves will have likely sold them on and disappeared with the cash long before that happens.

This article originally appeared on PCMag.com.

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People Are Horrified That Facebook’s Hidden Inbox Is Hiding Incredibly Important Messages

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Facebook has a hidden message folder where it filters messages it thinks you don’t want to see — sometimes with serious and unintended consequences.

Users are complaining about not seeing messages from since-deceased family members, people reaching out to help them, and even people contacting them to let them know their friends have died.

Back in October 2015, the social network revamped its messaging system.

Previously, you had your “Inbox,” and an “Other” folder where messages from people who aren’t friends or friends-of-friends would end up. But it replaced this second folder with “Message Requests” — which let people you’re not connected with ask to be able to talk.

But what very few people realize is there is now also a third category of messages: Filtered Message Requests. These filtered messages are what Facebook thinks is spam, and so doesn’t even notify you about. They’re also not easy to find.

There has been a spate of articles over the last few days explaining how to access them. Judging by the reaction on Twitter, almost no one knew it was there.

 

A lot of the time, the feature appears to be fulfilling its purpose pretty well — protecting people from strangers’ spam they’ve got no interest in viewing.

facebook messenger hidden folder death daniel emery
Daniel Emery

The message Daniel Emery received informing him his friend had died — and which he only discovered two months later.

But there have also been cases of it hiding far more important messages, meaning their intended recipients only see them when it’s far too late.

Former BBC technology journalist Daniel Emery contacted Business Insider after reading our story and checking the “filtered” folder out of curiosity.

He told us that back in February, the partner of an old college friend messaged him to tell him that his friend had died — but the message was filtered, so he only saw it today, two months later.

Emery said: “He was a friend of mine from when I was a student in Aberdeen. Used to be a good mate, obviously lost touch a few years ago, as you do.”

He had thought about reaching out, but never got round to it — and then saw the message letting him know his friend had “popped his clogs.”

“So its his partner — I don’t quite know who she is — picking up the pieces … it’s all a bit strange really.”

Emery’s not the only one to have experienced something like this.

Matt Spicer, from Bristol, England, said that his wife started crying after discovering the “filtered” inbox — because it contained a message sent by her cousin, who died before it was ever read.


And Brittany Knight wrote on Twitter that she lost her passport and missed the message from the person trying to return it to her due to the filter.


There are many more cases like this. Some are recent, while other messages appear to have been sent before the Filtered Message Requests inbox was introduced, and were then automatically moved to it once it was launched — all without ever being read.


The situation is made doubly frustrating by the fact that one of the big reasons for the change to Message Requests (and Filtered Message Requests) is to prevent things like this happening.

Tony Leach, a product manager at Facebook, told TechCrunch back when Message Requests launched: “We’ve heard so many stories like estranged parents trying to get back in touch, or you lost your wallet and someone trying to get in touch with you … That’s why we want to replace that with a system that makes it a lot easier to catch the messages that you want to see.”

Clearly, this hasn’t been a complete success.

But what can Facebook do about this? It’s a tricky one. If it errs on the side of caution, and filters more, then important messages will continue to fall through the cracks. But if it relaxes its filters, then more spam will likely get through too — and people will complain. (Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.)

Daniel Emery, who missed the message telling him of his friend’s death, would like Facebook to modify its messaging feature to add a more straightforward spam folder.

“Gmail and Google, for all its flaws, has a pretty sensible system,” he told Business Insider. “There is a folder for spam, you can look into it if you want, you can pull things out. It’s not hidden from you, and I think the issue with this is it’s kind of a bit too much ‘nanny state.'”

He added: “Facebook is trying to be overprotective. Overprotective comes at a cost, and things like this happening are exactly that … hiding it is never a good thing.”

If you want to check your Filtered Message Requests in the mobile app, load up Settings, then click on “People,” then click on “Message Requests,” then click on “See filtered requests.” If you’re on the desktop version of Facebook, click on the drop-down Messages tab, then on “Message Requests,” then press “See filtered requests.” For more detailed instructions, read this.
Via Entrepreneur!

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Facebook plans to buy M-Pesa, one of Africa’s largest mobile money platforms

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It was the first time that Mark Eliot showed envy on the largest Mobile money company on the planet. Mark made one of the largest buyouts in history when he bought social messaging company Whatsapp.

He also bought the premiere photo sharing app Instagram both of which have grown to over a billion monthly users making them the largest social networks and on top ten Websites on Alexa.

What it means for Mpesa If Facebook finally manages to acquire Mpesa, it will become a global company. It will have advantage of a worldwide exposure through merging with Facebook and it will get world class infrastructure by the elites of the Tech business.

Charges will go down, most probably so low due to a large user base. The negotiations are ongoing and soon we may be cerebrating one of our own, changing lives around the globe.

Source: dailynews

 

 

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