Ethiopia Releases 1,500 Prisoners In Eastern Somali Region – Statement

share on:

NAIROBI – Ethiopia has released more than 1,500 prisoners in its eastern Somali region, government officials said on social media, days after the government declared a state of emergency to try to tamp down unrest in Africa’s second most populous nation.

“On Wednesday, over 1,500 prisoners were released following a pardon by President Abdi Mohamed Omar,” the Somali Region’s communications bureau said on Facebook late on Wednesday, referring to the regional president.

ALSO READ   Where to Be, on the Right or Left of Abiy? That Is the Question

“The inmates had been jailed on charges that include anti-peace activities,” it added, without giving details.

Ethiopia has already released more than 6,000 prisoners since January, including some high-profile journalists and opposition leaders. They were charged with a variety of offences, including terrorism.

Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn said the releases were designed to increase “political space” in Ethiopia following anti-government protests that began in 2015.

ALSO READ   Nigeria Media Houses Recieve ₦100 Million Naira Each To Portray IPOB As The Aggressor In The On-Going Genocide

Hundreds of people were killed during two years of protests that convulsed the country’s two most populous provinces, whose ethnic Oromo and Amharic communities complain they are under-represented in the country’s corridors of power.

Friday’s declaration of a six-month-long state of emergency followed Hailemariam’s surprise resignation on Thursday. He remains in office, overseeing the region’s biggest economy until a new prime minister is appointed.

ALSO READ   Keitany, Desisa take top honors in 2018 New York City Marathon

The government previously imposed a state of emergency in October 2016, which was lifted in August 2017. During that time, curfews were in place, the movement was restricted and about 29,000 people were detained. It’s unclear how many remain in prison.

REUTERS

Leave A Comment Below
share on: